Story 31

Gardening has always been at the very heart of my life

I'm always hugely impressed with the enabling qualities that are so prized by the Leonard Cheshire charity.

Alan Titchmarsh

That includes an appreciation of the importance of gardening and of being in the garden itself.

A garden offers solace to those who find themselves incapacitated, but it also offers respite to those who are carers — an often overlooked requirement which a garden by its very existence can fulfil. For me gardening has always been at the very heart of my life — part of every day for me is spent out of doors, growing plants, making my surroundings more beautiful and, as a consequence, more enriching spiritually. Without a garden my life would be a far poorer place. I can’t imagine doing without one, but neither can I imagine that any organisation involved in caring for people would feel that a garden is unimportant.

Gardens remind us of our reliance on the natural world, but they also teach us to care for it; by doing so, we enable it to look after us, both spiritually and physically. Gardening offers us all, regardless of our physical limitations, a sense of involvement, achievement and one-ness with nature that few other activities can provide. It can also be tailored to suit anyone’s abilities, both physical and mental.

That Leonard Cheshire Disability understands this and prizes its gardens for their positive effect on all of us is much to their credit. I am proud to support their endeavours.

That Leonard Cheshire Disability understands this and prizes its gardens for their positive effect on all of us is much to their credit.